Harvesting Time

Yesterday, I was busy in my litttle gardens harvesting various crops.  This year, I planted a new heritage winter squash called Pink Banana.  They were advertised on the package as growing up to 3 feet long!  Thank goodness they only grew to around a foot long.  However, I was dismayed that only one squash per plant grew which took up alot of space for the meandering vegetable.  I also harvested a few butternut squash and left a few that were still maturing.  I didn’t plant any acorn squash this year, which I now regret.  So my squash harvest for 2013 is smaller.   Next year I’m going back to my old standard Butternut and Acorn Squash.

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Potatoes and Winter Squash

I planted 3 kinds of potatoes in my raised beds near the house:  sweet potatoes, red potatoes, and white potatoes.   The sweet potatoes were my experiment of the year.  They took a lot to get going in the spring:  First I had to sprout them (cut in half, upside down on soil) which took over a month for anything to happen.  Then, once the sprouts were about 4 inches tall, I had to break them off the sweet potato and root them in water.  Once rooted and the weather was warm ( > June 1st) I planted them in a raised bed covered with black plastic to keep the roots warm.  What a lot of fuss!  In the end, I only got some fingerling tubers – not enough results for all the effort.  My other potatoes needed to be planted twice since the squirrels kept digging them up!  They were more productive although too few.

Hops on the vine

Hops on the vine

Yesterday was beautiful and sunny with a temperature of around 12 degrees Celsius (53 F) so in a short sleeve T-shirt,  I spent several hours painstakingly cutting off individual hops ‘flowers’.   The smell of the hops brought back memories from a decade ago when I used to help my late husband make beer.  Big 25 litre glass Carboy bottles used to sit on our kitchen counters for weeks while the beer was ‘fermenting’ or whatever it does.  The whole house smelled like a still!  I don’t even like the taste of beer or even the smell of it either!   My job was to help rinse out the small storage bottles then assist with the filling of them.  Today, I managed to harvest about 10 cups of hops which are now in my dehydrator in the garage.  I didn’t realize how much my forearms were getting scratched by the prickly vines until later that night!  Ouch!   When the hops are ready, I’ll send them to my son to use.

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Apple

After harvesting, I cleaned the chimney and the inside of the pellet stove.  I figured that since I had my ‘outside’ clothes on already I may as well get really dirty and get this necessary job done.  Now it’s ready to burn.   Next week I’ll get around to cleaning out the cookstove upstairs.

Then I cooked a roast chicken, carrots, potatoes, corn, and a garden squash for supper.  That’s enough for one day……

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. df
    Oct 13, 2013 @ 01:16:40

    Nothing like a busy day with garden and home; it’s the most satisfying work there is. We just did the big woodstove and chimney clean recently too. Welcome back!

    Reply

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